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Anicurio #19 (Mice Maids in a Garden)© - Pencil Illustration
Anicurio #19 (Mice Maids in a Garden)© - Pencil Illustration

Anicurio #19 (Mice Maids in a Garden)© - Pencil Illustration

Regular price
$30.00
Sale price
$30.00
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Two Mice Maids

It was the year 1902 when a young mouse named Daisy Moffat arrived at 615 Easton Place, the London home of Lady Constance Ward-Courtly. She was a town mouse and had brought along very few belongings - a small carpet bag and a letter of engagement signed by Lord Gregory Courtly, Lady Constance's husband. It was offering her the job of an under-house parlor maid. Unfortunately, Lord Courtly was negligent in informing the other staff members of her arrival, causing much confusion and delay. Panic and apprehension rose in Daisy as she had traveled by train for the first time, many miles from her home in the Midlands. She was eager to start her new job and worried she might be turned away. Fortunately, after a frantic telegram was sent to Lord Courtly, things were sorted out, and Daisy began working under the supervision of Lady Constance's personal maid, Rose Wilmot.

Daisy eventually got used to her daily tasks, which included laundry, cleaning, and general housework. Her sewing skills came in handy, too, and were much appreciated in the house. Despite being a few years older, Rose and Daisy became very close friends. The Courtly household was running smoothly, but there was a palpable tension due to the frequent absence of Lord Courtly. Lady Constance was often left alone and saddened by her husband's absence. However, the two mice servants made every effort to cheer her up. They would tell her stories of their lives, and Rose would even make up tales of romance, pirates, and exotic lands to entertain Lady Constance. Daisy would read to her Lady in the evenings after supper to bring a smile to her face. These selfless acts contributed greatly to lifting her spirits.

One day, the family photographer for the Courtly household visited and took photographs of all the servants. Daisy and Rose had never posed for a photograph before, and the joy and excitement on Daisy's face (left) clearly shows how happy she was. Rose (right) seemed a little unsure of how to pose, but it was evident that these two working mice had a lasting friendship.

Lady Constance has her own biography:
‘Biography of a feline Lady - 1902’

I have illustrated in the style of a vintage Edwardian or Victorian photograph. This image is part of my 'Anicurio' collection. Each original illustration is carefully hand-drawn in pencil. Once finished, I often hand age and treat them with various dye methods, to resemble an old dusty antique photograph. I want this series to suggest something that was rediscovered by you. An inherited artifact from a mysterious benefactor? Or perhaps revealed in a long abandoned attic, lying at the bottom of a chest. Buried beneath old dusty clothes and fading handwritten notes.

Available as:

Paper Print Matte finish 8"H X 11"W (signed) - $30.00

Paper Print Matte finish. 9"H x 14"W (signed) $49.00

Original: Graphite and charcoal pencil on paper. 8.25" x 13" (image size)  with frame and matte. Total size: 14" x 19" - $1100.00

Watermark will not be printed on the image.

FREE shipping within the USA

All reproduction prints are scanned and printed using gallery standards, professional equipment, and materials. Ensuring the highest quality.

Some digital prints may have a slight enhancement from the original illustration to increase tone and color balance.

Two Mice Maids

 It was the year 1902 when a young mouse named Daisy Moffat arrived at 615 Easton Place, the London home of Lady Constance Ward-Courtly. Daisy was a country mouse and had brought along very few belongings - a small carpet bag and a letter of agreement signed by Lord Gregory Courtly, Lady Constance's husband. Daisy had received an offer of employment as an under-house parlor maid from Lord Courtly. However, upon her arrival, she discovered that Lord Courtly had forgotten to inform the other staff members of her arrival, which had caused confusion and delay. Daisy was frightened as she had traveled by train for the first time and was many miles away from her home in the Midlands. She was eager to start her new job but worried that she might be turned away due to the lack of communication. Fortunately, after an urgently dispatched telegram to Lord Courtly, the situation was resolved Things were sorted out, and Daisy began working under the supervision of Lady Constance's personal maid, Rose Wilmot.

Daisy eventually got used to her daily tasks, which included laundry, cleaning, and general housework. Her sewing skills came in handy, too, and were much appreciated in the house. Despite being a few years older, Rose and Daisy became very close friends. The Courtly household was running smoothly, but there was a palpable tension due to the frequent absence of Lord Courtly. Lady Constance was often left alone and saddened by her husband's frequent departures. However, the two mice servants made every effort to cheer her up. They would tell her stories of their lives, and Rose would even make up tales of romance, pirates, and exotic lands to entertain Lady Constance. Daisy would read to her Lady in the evenings after supper to bring a smile to her face. These selfless acts went a long way in lifting her spirits.

One day, the family photographer for the Courtly household visited and took photographs of all the servants. Daisy and Rose had never posed for a photograph before, and the joy and excitement on Daisy's face (left) clearly shows how happy she was. Rose (right) seemed a little unsure of how to pose, but it was evident that these two working mice had a lasting friendship.

Lady Constance has her own biography:
‘Biography of a feline Lady - 1902’