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Anicurio #9 (Weasel)©  - Pencil Illustration
Anicurio #9 (Weasel)©  - Pencil Illustration
Anicurio #9 (Weasel)©  - Pencil Illustration
Anicurio #9 (Weasel)©  - Pencil Illustration

Anicurio #9 (Weasel)© - Pencil Illustration

Regular price
$29.00
Sale price
$29.00
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'Lord Timothy's race to the top'

Lord Timothy Swindon. Younger son of the 5th. Duke of Withensea, West Yorkshire, UK.

Living under the shadow of his Father, Lord Lewis Pereguin Swindow, Timothy was known to all as 'Young Timothy.' This moniker was often resented, but after years of futile protesting, he came to accept it.

Striving to reach beyond the shadow his father cast, Young Timothy became swept up in the growing presence of a new form of transportation, the motor car. Timothy and his collection of friends were all loosely tied together by their equal fascination with this new form of transportation. So they would have 'meets' every Sunday, tinkering under the hood, racing, and admiring each other's automobiles. 

This ultimately led to the Paris to Rouen race on 22nd July 1894. It was preceded by several days of automobile exhibition and qualifying events, which created great crowds and much excitement.

Having made it through the qualification round, the race itself was 78 miles (126 km). The first driver across the finishing line at Rouen took the trophy and 5,000 franc prize money. Young Timothy drove a steam-powered 1894 Santler Dogcart, consisting of a varnished wooden body and an iron platform. It reached almost 12 mph (17 km/h). He won but was immediately disqualified for employing a 'stoker' to help keep the vertical boiler going. To add insult to injury, the local publications mistakenly referred to him as a 'ferret'. He was, of course, a weasel. 

Understandably, Timothy was devastated that his moment of glory was so swiftly taken from him. But always resolute, he began to show an increasing interest in petrol engines. Over time, Timothy launched a company manufacturing a famous line of early petrol-engine automobiles. He incorporated the 'Benz' engine Carl Benz (later of Mercedes-Benz) developed into his design. 

Only a little is known about Timothy's social life after his factory closed in 1935. He was a very private weasel. One notice in a London newspaper announced his engagement to Lady Foxworthy of Doncaster. Family records show they had a long and happy marriage. They had two weasel daughters, Duff and Brett Swindon.

Illustrated in the style of a vintage Edwardian or Victorian photograph. This image is part of my 'Anicurio' collection. Each original illustration is carefully hand drawn in pencil. Once finished, I hand age and treat them with various dye methods, to resemble an old dusty antique photograph. I want this series to suggest something that was rediscovered by you. An inherited artifact from a mysterious benefactor? Or perhaps revealed in a long abandoned attic, lying at the bottom of a chest. Buried beneath old dusty clothes and fading hand written notes.

Paper print (Matte finish - Signed): 8" X 10" - $29.00 

Paper print (Matte finish - Signed): 10.5W" x 13.5H"  - $49.00

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